Reviews

Review by Linda Barta of the Lone Jack Museum and Historical Society. This review was in THE ACORN, the Newsletter of the Lone Jack Historical Society, Vol. IX, No. 1. In the review she calls ELIZABETH'S WAR a "gem." Read a large portion of the review below.

"Finding a historical fiction novel set in the Missouri/Kansas border area worth reading has been a quest. Finally, I found a gem. Author D.L. Rogers was raised in the East with ancestors who fought on both sides during the late unpleasantness. Always interested in history, growing up she called herself a "Yebel."

Since moving here to the border area she has discovered and embraced the historical significance the Border War presents. After extensive research following one Cass County woman, Elizabeth McFerrin, Rogers has written a fictionalized account of her life during the war in ELIZABETH'S WAR MISSOURI 1863.

Of note to those of us interested in Lone Jack is that Elizabeth's oldest son, Samuel, was recruited and fought in the battle of Lone Jack at age 16. He survived the battle and the war. He eventually returned home to find a lone chimney standing on the homestead. He tracked down and found his mother and siblings as refugees in St. Clair County. They were staying with relatives.

On the first page Rogers drew me in with the vivid, emotionally charged pictures she paints with her pen. Her story begins in late April 1861. Her character, Elizabeth Miers, sits in the shade of her porch, breathing in the comforting aroma of baking chicken and cornbread. Her mending forgotten in her lap, she reflects on the shadow of violence her family has lived under for more than five years.

She and her husband, James, have settled on 60 acres outside of the small town of Austin, south of Harrisonville. The town was now a thriving merchant town as well as a hotbed of politics. Could Austin have mirrored Lone Jack?

All her family wanted was to be left alone without fear of reprisals for what they believed--or not, to remain neutral. Wasn't that a constitutional right -- to believe what you wanted?

Drawing heavily from many sources, Rogers says that her character Elizabeth began exerting a will of her own as the writing began. She says that her Elizabeth fought her pen and the constraints of history. Elizabeth Miers wanted her story told but with Elizabeth McFerrin's surrounding history intact.

Rogers understands the complexity of the issues surrounding the Civil War. She does not shy away from the simplicity of slavery as the cause. She understands how people and families can be caught up in the time and place simply trying to survive....

The chapters are short, giving the reader the opportunity to pick up the book for a few moments, or read on and really shadow Elizabeth as she struggles to provide for and protect her family through the war on the border and General Ewings Order #11."

(Linda Barta of the Lone Jack Historical Society)


Review for THE WHITE OAKS SERIES: August 9, 2016: (an Illinois resident)

Diane Rogers has written 9 books in the “White Oaks” series. It is well worth your time to read every one. A tremendous amount of research was done in order to obtain all the historical facts from the mid 1800’s as Diane writes about life in the territory that she obviously loves.

The first book is about Emma and Jonathon Carter, a young couple who leave their home in St. Louis and travel by riverboat up the Missouri River to the Independence area. They have a lot of hardships on their journey but eventually they build “White Oaks” and settle there.

My husbands Great-Great Grandmother was a Cherokee Indian so I especially like the book “Ghost Dancers”, which was about the terrible conditions the Indians were forced to live under and the couple who tried to help them.

All of the books have their own characters and stories but all are in some way connected to Emma and Jonathon Carter and know they are always welcome to “come home” to White Oaks.

These books lead you through the lives of the people during that period in time and you soon feel as if you a part of it. They have a lot of history about the Civil War and the Western frontier.

If you love history you will love these books.

Carolyn Ruff

Review for ELIZABETH'S WAR: Missouri 1863, October 14, 2015, by Shirley Parsons:


Elizabeth’s War, while a work of fiction, it is based on the true life events just before and during the Civil War.  All of us have much to learn about the lives and struggles of our relatives in this not too distant past, whether Union or Confederate.  Elizabeth’s War tracks the trials of a Southern family, the Miers, who had migrated to Missouri to settle into a peaceful family life apart from slavery during the mid 1800’s. It recounts the devastation visited on families by Brigadier General Ewing’s General Order No. 11, which expelled all those living in Cass, Jackson and Bates counties in Missouri unless they took an oath of loyalty to the Union regardless of their views on slavery or their general desire not to become involved with the war itself.  Even if they took the oath, they were expelled from their lands and homes.  All lands and useful property were confiscated and what could not be used or plundered was utterly destroyed.  The book is a tale of hardship and loss, but ultimately of the endurance and perseverance of the human spirit, families who had been stripped of everything they had.  When you think things could not possible be worse as the families traveled south to escape Union soldiers, Bushwhackers, Redlegs, Kansas Jayhawkers, the Missouri Guard and Militia and others, you discover that no matter how little you think you are left with, there is always one more thing that can be stripped from you.  That is unless you take into consideration the grit, the will, the determination to survive no matter what, the strength of faith, love and the hope that survives all.  This book is compelling from the beginning to the end and imagine my surprise when I discovered a distant relative in the very last chapter. 

Reviews for THE OLD COOTS: Sam:

DL Rogers has done an outstanding job of taking us into the heart of the South during the Civil War era and right into the misery inflicted upon peoples both North and South by its years of conflict; conflict between states, between family and between friends.  Ms. Rogers follows the life of Mr. Sam Whitmore, his family, his marriage to Ellie, his children and his relationship with former slaves, Horace and Jefferson.  Sam’s initial struggle was with his conscience in that he could not support the idea of slavery and wanted to separate himself from it and from those who supported it.  He meets Ellie who embraces Sam’s desire to break from the traditional role of plantation owner and work his own land right alongside Horace and Jefferson, who Sam freed.  As the war broke out, Sam was forced into the conflict in every way possible.  Sam suffered unspeakable tragedies, loss of family and friends, loss of his home, but the thing that keeps you drawn to this book is how Sam overcame the physical and emotional conflicts as a Southerner drawn into a war he does not support.  Sam’s sole desire was to protect his family, his friends and his home.  Sam’s integrity and his humanity shine through in every  chapter.  Sam travels from Tennessee to Missouri, back to Tennessee then on to Virginia and into the heart of the war.  Sam joins forces with a number of colorful characters as they embark on a perilous journey both to dodge Northern forces and conscription by Southern forces on their way to join the 14th Tennessee Volunteers to fight for the South under General Lee.  To avoid giving too much away, you will be drawn into this book and Sam’s life from the first to the last page.  An excellent read!

Shirley Parsons


MY FIRST REVIEW FOR THE OLD COOTS: Sam!  I clapped and cried at the same time. 

My name is Brian Payne, and I’ve been a “War of Northern Aggression” reenactor for 16 years now as a Member of the 14th Tennessee Volunteer Infantry, as well as an artillery Battery commander with Parker’s Virginia Battery. I am the administrator for both the 14th Tennessee and Parker’s Battery Facebook pages. Several months ago, I was contacted on the 14th Tennessee’s Facebook page by D.L. Rogers asking for information on the 14th . She explained that she was researching the 14th Tennessee Volunteer Infantry so as to include the Unit in a new book she was writing. I could tell from our initial FB conversation, as well as our telephone conversations that came later, that she was really committed to being as factual as possible in the chapters of her book that deals with the 14th. Over the years we (as 1 of only 2 reenactor groups in the country that portray the 14th Tennessee) have been asked for assistance with many projects, in both film and books, and we are always very careful about what we agree to be associated with due to our fierce loyalty and devotion to those men we honor, and how they will appear in these projects once they are completed. I felt from the very beginning of my association with Diane that she was absolutely committed to accurately portraying these men as they really were. I was honored to assist her throughout the process by giving advice and some historically accurate facts concerning the 14th from 1862 Winter camp, through the Battle of Gettysburg, and to a smaller extent, to the end of the War. After completing the book, she asked me to review it and give her my thoughts. She graciously sent me an autographed copy to read, and I must say, I had a real problem putting the book down once I started to read. The main character joins the 14th Tennessee in time to fight at the Battle of Gettysburg, and she does a terrific job in describing the destructive and deadly carnage that these men had to endure near that small Pennsylvania town in July of 1863. I must say not only did I enjoy the chapters covering Sam’s experiences in the 14th, but I found the entire book captivating in the sense that the reader feels as though he/she is actually there experiencing all the things that Sam is going through. I am so glad she contacted me and asked for assistance in this project, and after seeing the finished product, I’m proud to be associated with it in a very small way. I highly recommend this book to anyone who has found true love during life’s journey, still enjoys reading a book that is hard to put down once started, and would like to take a trip back to the 1860’s to a simpler, and terrible, time in the history of this great country!

 Check out this link for my interview with Frank Haight of the Independence Examiner:

http://www.examiner.net/article/20150612/NEWS/150619651

 A recent review for CALEB at Amazon:

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Very good read. The book is about a black man in the time period after the Civil War. I loved his character. He always tries to look deep into a person and uses that to deflect their antagonism towards him. This particular author has written several books about the Civil War era and others. She is a fairly new author and has improved with each book. I encourage anyone to check out her other books.

  • Review for THE OLD COOTS: Sam by Brian Payne, Re-Enactor for the 14th Tennessee Volunteers

    My name is Brian Payne, and I’ve been a “War of Northern Aggression” reenactor for 16 years now as a Member of the 14th Tennessee Volunteer Infantry, as well as an artillery Battery commander with Parker’s Virginia Battery. I am the administrator for both the 14th Tennessee and Parker’s Battery Facebook pages. Several months ago, I was contacted on the 14th Tennessee’s Facebook page by D.L. Rogers asking for information on the 14th . She explained that she was researching the 14th Tennessee Volunteer Infantry so as to include the Unit in a new book she was writing. I could tell from our initial FB conversation, as well as our telephone conversations that came later, that she was really committed to being as factual as possible in the chapters of her book that deals with the 14th. Over the years we (as 1 of only 2 reenactor groups in the country that portray the 14th Tennessee) have been asked for assistance with many projects, in both film and books, and we are always very careful about what we agree to be associated with due to our fierce loyalty and devotion to those men we honor, and how they will appear in these projects once they are completed. I felt from the very beginning of my association with Diane that she was absolutely committed to accurately portraying these men as they really were. I was honored to assist her throughout the process by giving advice and some historically accurate facts concerning the 14th from 1862 Winter camp, through the Battle of Gettysburg, and to a smaller extent, to the end of the War. After completing the book, she asked me to review it and give her my thoughts. She graciously sent me an autographed copy to read, and I must say, I had a real problem putting the book down once I started to read. The main character joins the 14th Tennessee in time to fight at the Battle of Gettysburg, and she does a terrific job in describing the destructive and deadly carnage that these men had to endure near that small Pennsylvania town in July of 1863. I must say not only did I enjoy the chapters covering Sam’s experiences in the 14th, but I found the entire book captivating in the sense that the reader feels as though he/she is actually there experiencing all the things that Sam is going through. I am so glad she contacted me and asked for assistance in this project, and after seeing the finished product, I’m proud to be associated with it in a very small way. I highly recommend this book to anyone who has found true love during life’s journey, still enjoys reading a book that is hard to put down once started, and would like to take a trip back to the 1860’s to a simpler, and terrible, time in the history of this great country!

  • Review for THE OLD COOTS: Sam by Shirley Parsons

    Review of THE OLD COOTS: Sam by Shirley Parsons DL Rogers has done an outstanding job of taking us into the heart of the South during the Civil War era and right into the misery inflicted upon peoples both North and South by its years of conflict; conflict between states, between family and between friends. Ms. Rogers follows the life of Mr. Sam Whitmore, his family, his marriage to Ellie, his children and his relationship with former slaves, Horace and Jefferson. Sam’s initial struggle was with his conscience in that he could not support the idea of slavery and wanted to separate himself from it and from those who supported it. He meets Ellie who embraces Sam’s desire to break from the traditional role of plantation owner and work his own land right alongside Horace and Jefferson, who Sam freed. As the war broke out, Sam was forced into the conflict in every way possible. Sam suffered unspeakable tragedies, loss of family and friends, loss of his home, but the thing that keeps you drawn to this book is how Sam overcame the physical and emotional conflicts as a Southerner drawn into a war he does not support. Sam’s sole desire was to protect his family, his friends and his home. Sam’s integrity and his humanity shine through in every chapter. Sam travels from Tennessee to Missouri, back to Tennessee then on to Virginia and into the heart of the war. Sam joins forces with a number of colorful characters as they embark on a perilous journey both to dodge Northern forces and conscription by Southern forces on their way to join the 14th Tennessee Volunteers to fight for the South under General Lee. To avoid giving too much away, you will be drawn into this book and Sam’s life from the first to the last page. An excellent read!

  • Arlena Parsons' Review for THE WHITE OAKS SERIES

    Dear Ms. Rogers, I’ve never read a book before that drew me into its happenings like your books have. I felt like I was in the scenes with the characters from the beginning to the very last book. Each book had a way of working you right into each adventure. I just couldn’t wait to see what happened next. Thank you for a very wonderful read. Arlena Parsons (86 years old)

  • Reviews for Original Trilogy (TOMORROW'S PROMISE / BROTHERS BY BLOOD / and GHOST DANCERS)

    Reviews for TOMORROW’S PROMISE: Survival on the Plains By Diane (D.L.) Rogers "This story is very heavy, but beautifully written. The author D.L. Rogers has definitely done her history research. As an absolute history buff, and my husband a southern boy, completely interested in the Civil War, we have thoroughly studied this War, and its reasons for occurring, Ms. Rogers is right-on in her research. Being a first generation American, and growing up on the west coast, the Civil War was not in much of my education, but Ms. Rogers has beautifully and accurately done her research intricately weaving it throughout this entire story. It is unconscionable to me what people do to each other in times of war, the Civil War included. The experiences that Ben and Sarah face, the people they come against whether Indians or soldiers, and the horrible things one group of people did to another group all because they thought their side was right is so sad, and vividly depicted in this story. This a lovely story, good triumphs over numerous evils, but ends up very strong in the end. If you love American history, this story is a must read!!" Reviewed by Desiree of Enchanting Reviews, 4 ENCHANTMENTS

  • Steve Foster Review for AMY

    Diane, I just wanted to tell you how much I enjoyed reading Amy, the book I bought last August. My son, Steve Jr., who is a coach for the KC Royals, and I were at the Lone Jack Memorial on August 20, 2011 and I so enjoyed meeting you and discussing your books. Amy was a fascinating read and I look forward to starting the series you have completed. I will be ordering your first book soon and hope we meet again one day. Your friend and fan, Steve Foster Sr.

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